Term Limits for Members of U.S. Congress

John

 

In forming the USA National Government, George Washington, one of the Founding Fathers and the First President, laid down a standard for all citizens: Put the U.S. Constitution first!

That wise guidance has been, from the beginning and continuing, formally put into effect by a sworn oath “to defend the Constitution against all enemies, foreign and domestic”, taken upon assuming office by Presidents, Vice Presidents, and Members of both Houses of Congress. As an aside, that oath is also taken by every Member of the U.S. Armed Forces and every appointed Official of all three separate and independent Branches of the Federal Government: Executive, Congressional, and Judicial. We are all in this boat together…

George Washington also established the precedent of two 4-year terms as President being enough. President Franklin D. Roosevelt broke that precedent and was elected four times: 1932, 1936, 1940, and 1944. The Constitution has since been amended to conform to George Washington’s original two terms precedent.

Donald Trump became the USA’S 45th President, having no political or military experience. Among the many changes he has verbally supported has been “To drain the swamp” in Washington, DC. Technically, when the State of Maryland donated the land that became Washington, DC, it was literally a swamp. It had to be drained before construction of the new seat of the national government could begin, circa 1805. So in a sense, Trump is about 200 years late in his proposal.

On the other hand, it is not too late to “drain the swamp” (reduce graft and corruption) in the U.S. Congress via new term limits. But it is always, and should be, difficult to pass another amendment to the U.S. Constitution, and one for Congressional term limits essentially would be viewed as “suicide” by long-serving members, who would be voting on the issue.  

My idea for such an Amendment is to set a life-time limit for each citizen as follows: two terms in the Senate (12 years) and six terms in the House of Representatives (12 years). That should keep the Congressional swamp drained.

コメントを残す

メールアドレスが公開されることはありません。 * が付いている欄は必須項目です